«Part of understanding that ecosystem means acknowledging that many readers don’t care what outlet their news comes from — they care about getting it quickly. When it comes to breaking news, Smith says, the team working on the app won’t wait for BuzzFeed to publish a story if someone else has a scoop. ‹I don’t think you can do news well if you think that your news organization produces the only content of value. That’s crazy,› Smith says. ‹There’s a humility required in doing news well now. It requires being open to the Internet, and realizing you’re a part of a collaborative project with other news outlets.›»
«We are unwavering in our desire to reach a mass audience, but the best way to do that may be through multiple experiments with existing digital communities rather than trying to draw a large audience to yet another omnibus site…»
— First Look Media founder Pierre Omidyar in an update on how the company is evolving.

The author of this article has seen your comment at 4:55

Just a little idea: What if reader comments on news sites had these “Seen by the author at 4:55” labels that you know from chats?

5 things Flappy Bird can teach news organisations about mobile from @davidho.

«Editors do need to keep in mind that for nonprint readers (now, by far, a majority), context must occur, as much as possible, in each individual article, photograph or graphic. The delivery system for providing context has changed radically, even as the need for that context is more important than ever.»
— The NYT’s public editor, Margareth Sullivan, in an article discussing the Times’ coverage of the Gaza conflict.
«No great speeches to empty rooms. No finding a great piece of content but not doing the work to draw people’s attention to it. There’s a strange disconnect where you’re not supposed to care if anyone reads your thing, that it’s all about the intrinsic quality of the piece of work.»
— Upworthy founder Eli Pariser’s most important rule, as quoted in On The Nice Internet, Sharing Is Caring.
«The most important fight in journalism today isn’t between short vs. long-form publications, or fast vs. thorough newsrooms, or even incumbents vs. start-ups. The most important fight is between realists and nostalgists.»
«Just because something costs zero doesn’t mean people aren’t willing to pay something.»
— Bharat Anand, strategy professor at Harvard Business School, in «Business School, Disrupted».

The media mogul (twice over) on being both contagious and sticky. Epic interview by Felix Salmon, worth the time.